“Toxic fungus thrives in bathroom sinks” – a sequence-based examination of Fusarium in homes and buildings

Another “scary microbe that lives in your house/office/car” story.  In this case, the fungi Fusarium which can be pathogenic, particularly for people with immune deficiencies.   To be fair, the authors of the scientific study take pains to point out that “the serious infections caused by fusaria are relatively uncommon and that these fungi may even …

Homeland Security Funding Opportunity – Reference Genome Sequencing

Just a quick note about a funding opportunity of potential interest. The Department of Homeland Security “BAA 12-04  Whole Genome Approach to Microbial Forensics (WGAMF)” program has a grant called “Whole-genome sequencing to capture the global biodiversity of human, plant and animal pathogens (bacterial, viral and fungal) in support of microbial forensics analysis” https://baa2.st.dhs.gov/portal/public/Menu.action?page=baa_current_solicitations Here’s the …

Advances in imaging the oral microbiome would have interesting applications in the built environment

When we talk about “community structure” in microbial ecology we are usually referring to the composition and frequency of various species in that community, information often arrived at through rRNA sequencing and/or metagenomics. But there is of course also a “real” structure of communities, particularly in biofilms.  Some species tend to be physically associated with …

Updated microBEnet calendar – additional suggestions wanted

In preparation for the New Year, we’ve updated our “Upcoming Events” page and calendar to include conferences/workshops etc. that we hope will be of interest.  We’ve tried to include both microbiology and building sciences, but mainly places where they overlap. http://www.microbe.net/upcoming-events/ Please feel free to send us any additional suggestions!  

“Microbial Home” by Philips takes a futuristic, holistic, positive look at microbes in the home

As with our recent musings on probiotics for buildings, sometimes it’s fun and productive to think about the distant future in the microbiology of the built environment. And Royal Philips Electronics (Netherlands) has done just that with their futuristic “Microbial Home” project.  I’m not saying every one of their ideas will work, or that I’m …