Susceptibility of green and conventional building materials to microbial growth

“Susceptibility of green and conventional building materials to microbial growth” Indoor Air journal, accepted for publication Abstract Green building materials are becoming more popular. However, little is known about their ability to support or limit microbial growth. The growth of fungi was evaluated on five building materials. Two green, two conventional building materials and wood …

Database of indoor environment-indoor microbiome literature available

You can download the database of over 360 publications that report characteristics of the indoor environment along with the microbes found in the studies. Each publication is entered as a record and includes citation, abstract, keywords, organisms, substrates, and environmental conditions as reported by the authors. The database in MS Access format is searchable for …

Dusty Houses and Type 1 Diabetes

Among the cleanest and wealthiest countries in the world, Finland has the highest rate of Type 1 diabetes, while other messier and poorer countries have much lower rates. A recent article in the Washington Post discusses ongoing research to explore how exposure to dust and bacteria in houses might contribute to the onset of Type …

MoBE Postdoctoral Fellowship: Microbial activity in house dust and interactions with phthalate esters

Are the microbes in our homes alive, or are they dead? If they are alive, what are they doing? We plan to answer these questions during my MoBE Postdoctoral Fellowship, funded by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. Bacteria in house dust can originate from places such as the outdoors or from the bodies of humans. …

New Sloan Foundation funded project: The House Dust Fungal Microbiome — Influences and Effects

Just received an announcement that a new project has been funded through the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation’s program in the Microbiology of the Built Environment. The project is titled “The House Dust Fungal Microbiome — Influences and Effects.” and the PI is Susan V. Lynch from UCSF.  She kindly sent us a summary description of the …

Stirring up the air with vacuums – interesting new study

Well, normally I find popular press stories about getting rid of dust and bacteria to be mostly fear mongering.  But this article from WebMD (which much of the time I have complaints about) actually seems worth a look: Are Vacuum Cleaners Bad for Your Health?.  The article discusses in part new work from Australian researchers on …

‘Bring us your dirt’ — Exposure Society “citizen science”

The International Society of Exposure Science, ISES, will hold its annual conference October 23-27 in Baltimore. The Society has invited all participants to bring dust samples for its Metals in Dust Samples Study. “A special ISES Metals in House Dust Study will analyze house dust samples supplied by the meeting attendees and report results at …