Building “science” blogs (?)

Many recent microbe.net post links to “blog of the day” provide diverse, interesting reading related to microbial ecology. To identify some worthwhile “building science” blogs, we contacted some of the most knowledgeable building scientists we know. The results suggest some observations comparing building science and microbial ecology. Both domains (“fields,” “disciplines”) are highly diversified, ranging …

Proposed ASHRAE Standard on Prevention of Legionellosis – public comment invited

[edited from the ASHRAE press release] Changes to clarify requirements in a proposed standard are open for public comment. The proposed ASHRAE standard, 188P, Prevention of Legionellosis Associated with Building Water Systems, specifies what must be done to control the spread of legionellosis. The standard helps facility managers/owners understand how to apply the available information …

Guidelines: travel-related Legionnaire’s Disease investigation

After recognition of recent incidents of Legionnaires’ Disease in hospitals, more attention is being paid to Legionella spp by hotels and other travel industry members. In 1986, several European countries formed the European Working Group for Legionella Infections (EWGLI) to share knowledge about monitoring potential sources of Legionella as well as to provide technical guidelines …

Lessons from 2012: Lake Arrowhead Microbial Genomes

Note from Jonathan Eisen.  This is a guest post from Srijak Bhatnagar a microbiology graduate student at UC Davis. Some of the best conferences arguably are the small one. Instead of the grand size and rapid pace, these warm gatherings over a period of few days allows for budding researchers like me to listen to …

Paper can transfer bacteria too – hand to paper and back again

We recently wrote about moldy documents in French archives and a higher incidence of asthma among workers who handled documents than others working in the same spaces but not handling them. See our previous post: “Hands off the moldy docs (for your own good?)” Now we find researchers reported that bacteria can also be transferred …

Navel gazing – microbial style

Rob Dunn of North Carolina State University has written a charming and fascinating piece on the microbes that inhabit our belly buttons. You can find it here on the Scientific American blog site (http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/guest-blog/2012/11/07/after-two-years-scientists-still-cant-solve-belly-button-mystery-continue-navel-gazing/). I strongly recommend it for the skill of his writing as well as the extremely interesting insights into the microbes in …

Growing houses like bones … interesting system for studying microbes in buildings

Well this is both weird and very interesting: 3D houses “grown” like bones | SmartPlanet.  Sort of a combination of 3D printing, bioinspired design, and architecture.  Not sure what the future of this is but if they want to have walls that grow / respond to stresses they could consider making them actually alive.  Maybe it …

Answer to the seasonal flu mystery? – Indoor environment-microbe interactions

The Virginia Tech group has published another paper looking at the impacts of indoor environmental conditions on microbes. In this case, it’s potentially a key clue to the on-going search for an explanation to the seasonality of influenza puzzle. It’s not just airborne humidity but also the droplet. composition that matter. Past efforts to find …

New Sloan-funded program in microbiology of the built environment: Greg Caporaso, office surface microbiomes across climates

Another new Sloan-funded project in the microbiology of the built environment called “To analyze and model the establishment of microbial communities over time on different office surface materials in different climates”.   This project is being undertaken by Greg Caporaso at Northern Arizona University. Full description below: The goal of this project is to understand successional patterns …