Websites for the Hospital Microbiome Project and the Home Microbiome Project

I recently posted here about one of the new Sloan-funded projects in the microbiology of the built environment, the “Hospital Microbiome Project”.  One thing I didn’t mention is that they already have some interesting preliminary results from the construction phase of the project that are worth checking out. Jack Gilbert has also been involved in …

New Sloan-funded program in microbiology of built environment: Jill Banfield, ICU microbiome and infant gut microbiome

The second new project to receive funding from the Sloan foundation is a project entitled “Analysis of the ICU room environment as a source of microorganisms colonizing the GI tract of premature infants”.  This project is being managed by Jill Banfield at UC Berkeley, along with her Co-PIs; Michael Morowitz (University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine) …

New Sloan-funded project in microbiology of the built environment – Jack Gilbert, Hospital Microbiome study

The Sloan Foundation has just announced funding for another two projects, we’ll be posting details here. The first project is called the “Hospital Microbiome Study” and will be managed by Jack Gilbert (University of Chicago) and Captain Benjamin Kirkup at the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research.  Check out the project website here.

Aerosol transmission of bacteria in a simulated hospital setting (they go far)

Heard about an interesting paper today (sadly not open access) describing airflow simulations in an aerosol chamber.  Basically they showed that if you release bugs from a mannequin, they spread all over the room… up to 3.5 meters away.   A worthwhile study, but not something that wasn’t known already.    What made this get so much …

New study on bacterial diversity in hospitals

Quick post here about a study that came out last month “Exploring Bacterial Diversity in Hospital Environments by GS-FLX Titanium Pyrosequencing” by Poza et al in Madrid. These authors used 454 sequencing of 16S to survey bacterial populations in the entrance hall and the ICU of a hospital in Madrid.   Not surprisingly, they found lower …

Lake Arrowhead Microbial Genomics Meeting 2012: Microbiology of the Built Environment Session

Last night was the Microbiology of the Built Environment session at the bi-annual Lake Arrowhead meeting.  This session was organized and sponsored by microBEnet.  I recorded some of the talks and will post those videos here after some editing. Here’s a summary of the speakers and the topics discussed. The first speaker was James Meadow …

Yes, microbes in healthcare facilities are important, but fear mongering doesn’t help

Ugg – not impressed by this press release from Clark Seif Clark: Healthcare Facilities need to be Aware of Microbial Pathogens.  This release has some accurate points such as that people with compromised immune systems need to worry about pathogens in the world around the.  And that people with compromised systems can be harmed by breathing …

Follow up to post about hospital garb & microbes: overworking nurses not a good idea

Interesting article on the possible connection between overworked/burned out nurses and hospital acquired infections: Burned-out nurses linked to more infections in patients – Vitals. Not clear whether any type of causal relationship was established here (though I doubt it).  But nevertheless, this is yet another factor to consider when thinking about the transmission of microbes in …

A year old but still worth pondering – is hospital garb a vector for microbes?

Accidentally wandered into this year old story from what was then MSNBC: Hospital garb harbors nasty bacteria, study says. The story discusses something that is nearly always on my mind when I hear discussions of hospital acquired infections – scrubs.  I am amazed, for example, at how many people from the UC Davis Veterinary School/Hospital (which …